Tag Archives: Bronx Museum of the Arts

Bronx Museum of the Art’s Biennial

6 Oct

From Oct. 20 thru Jan. 16 the Bronx Museum of the Arts, on the Grand Concourse and E. 165th St., exhibits the work of 69 emerging NYC artists who experienced the museum’s incubator program. Can’t wait to check it out. Hope you do too! (If you’ve never been to the Bronx Museum, I’d say this is a great time to begin. Such wonderful art there that too few of us see. And it’s free!)

Leonardo’s Work at Bronx Museum Ignites Focus, Thought, and Hopefully … Action

26 Feb

Feb. 26, 2021 — The Bronx Museum of the Arts was almost empty when I was there on Wednesday, but the message of its Shaun Leonardo exhibit, “The Breath of Empty Space,” was full … and forceful. 

The reflections from the glass covering of each large piece make you walk up close and wonder why the heck the curator didn’t see the reflections when they were installed. When I walked up to the piec, I didn’t understand what I was looking at. I saw various clothed body sections but I didn’t understand the action being taken. There were even cutouts from the charcoal drawing.

All this had purpose. 

Though the head of a person was non-existent, that empty half-body-like section was filled with parts of me. No, I was not killed, nor did I kill, but the message I interpreted for myself is that I have some role in the tale, even if I was in bed, or at Starbucks or on a bike ride for the seven minutes that Officer Derek Chauvin had his knee on George Floyd’s neck. Anti-racism doesn’t mean not killing or not saying racist things. It means acting, speaking, showing up — against racism. There were other pieces created with related messages, some a little harder to interpret, for me at least, which is why I need to, and look forward to, returning to the exhibit to look, and think more. And read more about racism in general. And learn. And act. 

In a video on the museum’s site, Leonardo shares his message briefly but in these minimal, intense words he offers more than any art critique can provide. 

[It took me a few minutes (and I think my friend, Larry, pointed it out) to see that that the emptiness in this piece with my, and the exhibit’s, reflection in center, was the absence of George Floyd. What’s more powerful than that?]

“And if you experience something lodged in your body, some guttural, visceral impression, then I wish for you to stay with that for a moment, to sit with the hurt,” he said, “so that you may leave this exhibition questioning the ways that we perceive. And at the end of this experience, we may discover ways to move differently in the world and to breathe life into this history of violence.”

The show is on until May 30. Attendance is free but you must make a reservation which is rather easy. Go if you can!

Seeing Bronx Museum Exhibits Wherever You Are

31 Mar

Museums, galleries, theatres, schools, concert halls … they all might be technically closed but that doesn’t mean they can’t share their art and creativity. So many have! Here’s a Bronx Museum of the Arts show I haven’t gotten to see close up yet, but am grateful for its visual video existence. Take a look:

 

P.S. The Bronx Museum of the Arts is sharing much of its work online via videos like above.

Don’t Miss Martin Wong Exhibit at Bronx Museum of the Arts

15 Jan

I forget why I headed into the Bronx Museum of the Arts seven weeks ago. But when I got there and ended up at the opening for a media tour (yup, I was lucky!) of the Martin Wong exhibit I felt like I was meant to be there. Among what I’ve seen at the museum, which is not nearly sufficient for a Bronxite former newspaper editor who has lived in the borough for 24 years, Wong’s work is the most significant. It’s the art of a proud, gay, artisitic urbanite (he spent some time here but was more of San Franciscan) obsessed with … well … his art and the influence of the diverse, difficult and delectable world around him. Here are a few photos I took of paintings that grabbed me, but they insufficiently document my experience there, which is why you should go! The exhibit closes on Feb. 14.

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